Waffle Overlay

WAFFLE® Overlay Logo

A Pressure Redistribution Surface

The EHOB™ WAFFLE® Overlay is more than a non-powered reactive air support surface, assisting in lateral transfers, boosts and turns to protect patients throughout the hospital journey.

Through immersion and envelopment, the WAFFLE Overlay is designed to redistribute pressure at bony prominences while the unique venting holes allow for air circulation to keep patients cool, dry and comfortable.

Ulcer Pain Icon

patients affected by pressure ulcers each year1

Hospital Bed Icon

die as a direct result of a pressure ulcer each year2

Hospital Icon

is the potential cost for hospital stays involving pressure ulcers3

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is the potential time it can take for pressure injuries to develop4

WAFFLE Overlay Scientific Principles PDF Preview

Know the Facts

There are many factors associated with the increased risk of developing pressure injuries. Identifying these factors and understanding the scientific principles that make them up are the first steps toward prevention.

Download our FREE Scientific Principles PDF to learn more!

WAFFLE Overlay

The EHOB™ WAFFLE® Overlay is a non-powered reactive air support surface that is designed to redistribute pressure at bony prominences with unique venting holes that allow for air circulation to keep patients cool, dry and comfortable.

WAFFLE Overlay Product Specs
Immersion vs Firm Resistance Graphic

Be confident in a solution The National Pressure Injury Advisory Panel (NPIAP) states that, “Immersion and envelopment are the phenomena that produce reduction in pressure at bony prominences.”that is designed to meet American Nurses Association (ANA) national standards by establishing a culture of safety.6

How It Works

A Versatile Solution to Meet Your Patients’ Needs

The WAFFLE Overlay is designed to reduce the risk of pressure injuries on multiple surfaces, protecting a variety of patient types from admission to discharge.

WAFFLE Overlay Versatility Circle

Versatility of the WAFFLE Overlay allows for patients to be protected in multiple positions, like supine and prone, with the added benefit of protecting staff in their everyday tasks with patient turning, repositioning and lateral transfers.

Woman in Supine Position
SUPINE POSITION
Prone Position
PRONE POSITION
Woman being turned by hospital staff
TURNING & REPOSITIONING
Woman being transferred to a new bed by hospital staff
LATERAL TRANSFERS

See How the WAFFLE Overlay Compares

Pressure Mapping is a visual assessment tool that detects and depicts the variations of interface pressure across a patient’s body. How do your supports surfaces compare to the WAFFLE Overlay?

Select an Angle

Stretcher Support Surface

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Stretcher Support Surface

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Stretcher Support Surface

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Stretcher Support Surface

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Select an Angle

Powered Support Surface

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Powered Support Surface

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Powered Support Surface

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Powered Support Surface

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Select an Angle

Therapeutic Surface: A

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Therapeutic Surface: A

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Therapeutic Surface: A

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Select an Angle

Therapeutic Surface: B

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Therapeutic Surface: B

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Therapeutic Surface: B

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Select an Angle

Therapeutic Surface: C

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Therapeutic Surface: C

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

Therapeutic Surface: C

EHOB WAFFLE® Overlay

The color spectrum and mmHg are used to detect various levels of pressure. Green and yellow indicate areas of pressure, while red tones indicate areas of exceptionally high pressure.

Product Information

WAFFLE Overlay Sales Aid

WAFFLE Overlay Clinical Guidelines

WAFFLE Overlay Versatility

WAFFLE Overlay Prone Sell Sheet

WAFFLE Overlay Clinical Fast Facts

WAFFLE Overlay Decision Tree

Contact Your Local EHOB Representative

We are committed to improving workplace safety and efficiency while providing better patient outcomes. Become a Partner in Prevention today!

Regional Sales Manager

Joe Ginilo

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Brett McElwaine

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Regional Sales Manager

Ryan Workman

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Regional Sales Manager

Brad Witt

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Regional Sales Manager

Adam Summer

North East

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Blogs

Understanding the TWO sides of Foot Drop

Managing foot drop can be complex. It is important to recognize that early identification of theseconditions, implementation of appropriate heel devices, and collaboration with Physical Therapy. The Foot. One-quarter of all human bones are located in the feet. 26 bones. 33 joints. Over 100 tendons, muscles, and ligaments. That’s a lot of moving parts. And […]

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Preventing pressure injuries on the heels is critical for good patient care

Heel devices that address foot drop while effectively accommodating SCD devices warrant a closer look. It is widely documented that the heel is the second most common site for pressure injuries. A prevalence study conducted over a 16-year period revealed that heel ulcers accounted for 34% of all PIs in bedridden patients. And 41% of […]

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Non-powered Reactive Air Support Surfaces — Simple Solutions for Complex Problems

Look for reactive air surfaces that promote good immersion, patient envelopment and proper flotation.  Quite simply, a reactive support surface can change its load distribution properties only in response to an applied load. Pressure is redistributed based on body movements, so patients are literally floating on air. They can be powered but they don’t have […]

Read More

References

1. Preventing Pressure Ulcers in Hospitals- A Toolkit for Improving Quality of Care. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (2014). Retrieved from https://www.ahrq.gov/sites/default/files/publications/files/putoolkit.pdf
2. 4 direct and indirect costs of pressure ulcers. Beckers Hospital Review. (2015). Retrieved from https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/quality/4-direct-and-indirect-costs-of-pressure-ulcers.html?oly_enc_id=2782G1224156I2W
3. Facts About Hospital Worker Safety. US Department of Labor and Occupational Safety and Health Administration. (2013). Retrieved from https://www.ors.od.nih.gov/sr/dohs/Documents/DLib_1.2_Factbook_508.pdf
4. Lyder, C. H., & Ayello, E. A. (2008). Pressure ulcers: a patient safety issue. In Patient safety and quality: An evidence-based handbook for nurses. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (US).
5. Qaseem, A., Mir, T. P., Starkey, M., & Denberg, T. D. (2015). Risk assessment and prevention of pressure ulcers: a clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians. Annals of internal medicine, 162(5), 359-369.
6. National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel Support Surface Standards Initiative. (2007). Terms and Definitions Related to Support Surfaces. Retrieved from: https://www.npuap.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/NPUAP_S3I_TD.pdf