EHOB Newsletter
Welcome to March! Spring is (hopefully) just around the corner. At EHOB, we welcome the excitement of some March Madness, a little luck of the Irish, and all things that signal the advent of warmer days ahead.

Much like spring, our March newsletter has a little bit of everything in it. As usual, our nurses have great insights and knowledge to share on such topics as the art of the "slow turning," the critical importance of correct inflation practices, and the elusive nature of the boggy heel.

We also have two new videos showcasing our WAFFLE® Custom Boots and WAFFLE® Mattress Overlay.

James G. Spahn, Founder and CEO
EHOB, Inc.
SLOW TURNS IN THE ICU
February 3, 2014
Shelley Lancaster, RN, MSN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

Hemodynamic Instability: Is It Really a Barrier to Turning Critically Ill Patients? is the title of a February, 2012 article in Critical Care Nurse by Kathleen Vollman RN, MSN, CCNS. Kathleen has long pioneered advances in mobilizing the most fragile ICU patients, including proning and lateral rotational therapy for improved respiratory outcomes. This article explores commonly held beliefs and misconceptions related to routine turning practices, and compels clinicians to re-think their approaches to this common care routine.

Continue
THE "BOGGY" HEEL
February 7, 2014
Linda Lankenau, MSN, RN, CWON

I’m trying to determine just what that is, and more importantly its significance to the development of a heel pressure ulcer.

I think I first really became aware of the word in relation to pressure ulcers when the NPUAP (National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel) added deep tissue injury to the staging system in 2007. In the medical dictionary, “boggy” refers to abnormal texture of tissues characterized by sponginess, usually because of high fluid content. In the NPUAP definition of suspected DTI it is used to help describe tissue that is painful, firm, mushy, warmer or cooler to the touch compared to adjacent tissue; or when assessing heel skin, compared to the other heel.

Continue
IMMERSION IS THE KEY TO PRESSURE REDISTRIBUTION AND PATIENT SAFETY
February 24, 2014
Shelley Lancaster, RN, MSN, ACNS-BC, CWOCN

The NPUAP and the EPUAP recommendations both put a strong emphasis on the value of immersion and envelopment to minimize tissue interface pressure in order to prevent pressure ulcer formation. Immersion and envelopment refer to the depth of penetration or the “sinking into” a support surface. The NPUAP’s Support Surface Standards Initiative (S3I) was formed in 2001 with the goal to provide standardized testing and clarification of the myriad of support surfaces that healthcare consumers faced. Recent NPUAP presentations have ranked static air as having the highest level of immersion, thus pressure redistribution, of surface types tested.

Continue
NEW IN-SERVICE VIDEO FEATURES
In-service video
In-service video

Corporate Office:
250 N. Belmont Ave.
Indianapolis, IN 46222

Phone:
(317) 972-4600
(800) 899-5553
Twitter Pinterest
© Copyright 2006-2013. EHOB, Incorporated.

Use this link to modify your email profile.

This email was sent by: %%Member_Busname%%

%%Member_Addr%%
%%Member_City%%, %%Member_State%%, %%Member_PostalCode%%, %%Member_Country%%